High Potassium Food List

By : | 0 Comments | On : December 20, 2017 | Category : Cooking

Potassium is both a mineral and an electrolyte: It’s vital for proper nerve and muscle function, and it’s essential for keeping the brain, heart, kidneys, and other organs healthy and in good working order. Like many other minerals and electrolytes, potassium is used at a higher rate when the body is hard at work, so it’s very important to consume high-potassium foods and drinks to prevent depletion when increased activity promotes sweating.

Besides on overview of the benefits of potassium, you’ll find a useful list containing more than 225 high-potassium foods to enjoy as part of your regular diet.

How Much Potassium Do I Need?


The recommended daily intake for potassium varies by age. So long as you are healthy and not on a low-potassium diet, it’s a good idea to follow scientifically backed recommendations laid out by the Food and Nutrition Center of the Institute of Medicine, and aim to meet daily minimum requirements for potassium intake. These minimum requirements are widely accepted; however, there are no published upper limits:

  • Infants between 0 to 6 months: 400 mg/day
  • Infants between 7 to 12 months: 700 mg/day
  • Children between 1 to 3 years: 3,000 mg/day
  • Children between 4 to 8 years: 3,800 mg/day
  • Children between 9 to 13 years: 4,500 mg/day
  • Children between 14 to 18 years: 4,700 mg/day
  • Adults age 18 and up: 4,700 mg/day
  • Women wo are pregnant: 4,700 mg/day
  • Women who are breastfeeding: 5,100 mg/day

Some individuals need higher levels of dietary potassium due to a condition called hypokalemia, or low potassium. There are many different causes of hypokalemia; however, the most common is increased urination brought on as a side effect of certain medications prescribed for people with heart disease or high blood pressure. Other causes include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excess alcohol intake
  • Laxative use
  • Low magnesium
  • Tobacco use
  • Certain antibiotics
  • Certain asthma medications
  • Folic acid deficiency
  • Diuretic use
  • Heavy sweating
  • Kidney disease
  • Adrenal gland dysfunction
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis

Women sometimes experience low potassium during pregnancy, usually associated with morning sickness and/or diarrhea or with the use of laxatives. If you are pregnant, then low potassium can bring side effects like swelling (edema) and muscle cramps. Adding more high-potassium foods can help keep you comfortable until your baby arrives.

Be sure to talk to your doctor if you think that you have low potassium levels, particularly if your symptoms are severe or painful. Low potassium can be an indication of an underlying issue

Potassium Benefits

Your body uses potassium for a variety of essential functions. Without enough, your system finds it very difficult to do some basic tasks – and you might notice low potassium symptoms such as muscle spasms, leg cramps, fatigue, weakness, severe headaches, and eye twitching. People with chronic potassium deficiency experience serious health problems including high blood pressure, heart palpitations, anemia, intestinal pain, swollen glands, and even diabetes. People with low potassium are also at a higher risk for stroke.

Some of the specific ways potassium benefits your body include:

  • Helps the body build proteins
  • Breaks down carbohydrates and facilitates their use
  • Builds muscle cells
  • Protects blood vessels from damage
  • Prevents blood vessel walls from hardening/thickening over time
  • Helps maintain high calcium levels for healthy bones
  • Maintains normal cellular growth and function
  • Maintains and regulates fluid balance in the body
  • Controls the heart’s electrical activity
  • Maintains a balance between acids and bases in the body
  • Maintains proper blood pressure
  • Stimulates brain activity
  • Balances the nervous system
  • Helps keep blood sugar levels stable
  • Prevents muscle cramps
  • Prevents irritability
  • Aids in the management of stress and anxiety

It’s important to note that some people should be careful not to eat too many high-potassium foods; for example, those with kidney problems, particularly individuals who rely on dialysis, should be very careful to watch their intake. According to the National Kidney Foundation, it is important for compromised individuals to follow strict dietary guidelines to keep potassium at a safe level. Knowing which foods are highest in potassium can help kidney patients and others avoid potential complications. Be sure to speak with your health care provider to determine your best course of action.

High Potassium Food List: 225+ Best Foods for Potassium

Many whole, natural foods are high in potassium, and as you scan the list that follows, you’ll notice that some classic “brain foods” are featured. There’s a good reason for this: Foods that contain high levels of potassium encourage oxygen to reach hungry brain cells, resulting in better neural function. Use this list of high-potassium foods as a tool for making better choices at every meal, and you’ll notice that you feel more alert. With continued healthy eating, you’ll find that your body functions well and you feel better than ever.

Acorn squash
Adzuki beans
Almonds
Almond butter
Almond milk
Amaranth
Antelope
Apples
Apricots
Artichokes
Arugula
Avocado
Baby bella mushrooms
Bamboo shoots
Bananas
Barley
Beechnuts
Beef, preferably lean
Beefalo
Beets
Beet greens
Bell peppers, all colors
Black beans
Blackberries
Blackcurrents
Blackstrap molasses
Blueberries
Bok choy
Brazil nuts
Breadfruit
Breadfruit seeds
Broccoli
Broccoli raab
Brown mushrooms
Brussels Sprouts
Buckwheat
Bulgur
Buffalo, aka bison
Butternuts
Butternut squash
Calamari
Cantaloupe
Carrots
Carrot juice
Cashews
Cashew butter
Cashew milk
Cauliflower, fresh or roasted
Celery
Celery root
Cherries
Chestnuts
Clementines
Chicken
Chickpeas
Chocolate, dark varieties
Cilantro
Clams
Cocoa
Coconut
Coconut milk
Coconut water
Cod
Coriander
Cowpeas
Cultured buttermilk
Cranberry beans
Crayfish
Crimini mushrooms
Dates
Delicata squash
Dried apricots
Dried currants
Dried legumes, i.e. beans, lentils, and peas
Dried peaches
Duck
Edamame
Elderberries
Elk
Endive
Enoki mushrooms
Fava beans
Fennel
Figs
Flax seeds, ground
Flounder
Garden cress
Garlic
Gingko nuts
Goat
Goose
Gooseberries
Grapes
Grape juice
Guavas
Guava juice
Grapefruit
Grapefruit juice
Great northern beans
Haddock
Halibut
Hazelnuts
Hemp seeds
Hickory nuts
Honeydew melon
Hubbard squash
Jackfruit
Jerusalem artichokes
Kabocha squash
Kale
Kamut
Kidney beans
Kiwi
Kohlrabi
Kumquats
Lamb
Lemons
Lettuce, loose-leaf varieties
Lima beans
Limes
Lychees
Macadamia nuts
Mackerel
Maitake mushrooms
Mangos
Milk
Moose
Mulberries
Mung beans
Mustard greends
Nectarines
Oats
Okra
Oranges
Orange juice
Palm hearts
Papaya
Parsley
Parsnips
Passionfruit
Passionfruit juice
Pasta, high-protein varieties
Patty pan squash
Pecans
Peaches
Pears
Peas
Peanuts
Peanut butter
Pepitas
Persimmons
Pigeon beans
Pili nuts
Pineapple
Pineapple juice
Pine nuts
Pink beans
Pinto beans
Pistachios
Potatoes, preferably with skin on
Perch
Plantains
Plums
Pomegranate arils
Pomegranate juice
Portabella mushrooms
Pork, preferably lean varieties
Prickly pears
Prunes
Prune juice
Pummelo
Pumpkin, fresh or canned
Radicchio
Raisins
Raspberries
Red beans
Red Kuri (Hokkaido) squash
Rhubarb
Rutabagas
Rye
Salmon
Sardines
Sesame seeds
Shallots
Spinach
Snapper
Sorghum
Soy milk
Soy nuts
Shiitake mushrooms, dried
Sisymbrium seeds
Spaghetti squash
Spirulina
Split peas
Sports drinks, preferably low-sugar varieties
Squash and pumpkin seeds
Strawberries
Sun dried tomatoes
Sun dried chilies
Sunflower seeds
Sunflower seed butter (sunbutter)
Sweet corn
Sweet dumpling squash
Sweet potatoes
Swiss chard
Tahini
Tangerines
Tangerine juice
Taro root
Tofu
Tomatoes, fresh or canned
Tomato juice
Tomato paste
Tomato sauce
Tuna
Turban squash
Turkey
Turnip greens
Turtle beans
Trout
TVP (texturized vegetable protein)
Venison
Walnuts
Wasabi
Watercress
Watermelon
White beans
White button mushrooms
Wild boar
Vegetable juice
Yams
Yellow squash (straight and crookneck varieties)
Yogurt, preferably unsweetened
Zucchini

High-Potassium Foods vs. Supplements

With so many high-potassium foods to choose from, most people find that they can increase their potassium intake easily with no need for added supplementation. If you feel like taking a supplement instead of changing your diet, be sure to talk with your doctor beforehand. Because of the potential for drug interactions and sometimes-serious side effects, it’s vital to double-check. Despite the fact that potassium is a very simple mineral that occurs naturally, balance is the key to good health.

 

 

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/tc/high-potassium-foods-topic-overview

https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/minerals/health-benefits-of-potassium.html

https://www.livestrong.com/article/246322-low-potassium-during-pregnancy/

https://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/food-sources-of-potassium.php

http://www.highpotassiumfoods.org/links-to-food-potassium-tables

http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium

https://www.medicinenet.com/low_potassium_hypokalemia/article.htm

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000479.htm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *